How Much Of The Brain Do We Use

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Directions: Read the passage and provide an answer to the

Ask: Directions: Read the passage and provide an answer to the questions below.

PASSAGE:

Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy

By Sara Goudarzi

If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).”

Teen thinking

In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'”

Developing sensitivity

Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK.

Question:

Which statement best describes the author’s attitude toward teenagers?

Select one:
a. Teens don’t think things out clearly and therefore they are unable to make logical decisions.
b. Teens are careless about other’s feelings.
c. Teens should be given a break because it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes
d. Teens today are lazy and have little respect for their elders.

b. Teens are careless about other’s feelings.

Directions: Read the passage and provide an answer to the

Ask: Directions: Read the passage and provide an answer to the question below.

PASSAGE:

Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy

By Sara Goudarzi

If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).”

Teen thinking

In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'”

Developing sensitivity

Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK.

Question:

Why did the author mention ‘hormonal shift’ in the article?

Select one:
a. to make fun of the teenagers
b. to validate the claim of the research on teens’ behavior in relation to their brain development
c. to persuade us to conduct research on teens’ behavior.
d. to present the conclusion of the article.

b. to validate the claim of the research on teens’ behavior in relation to their brain development

b. to validate the claim of the research on teens’ behavior in relation to their brain development

TRUE OR FALSE 1. The self has its own experiences

Ask: TRUE OR FALSE 1. The self has its own experiences and emotions which is very different and unique in any other way. 2. T Self-concept is a combination of both our actual self (present) and ideal-self (future-self). 3. The self has no several distinctive characteristics that separate from others “selves”. Self-concept can also be our comparison to others even our people who have a direct and indirect influence. 5. Having self-knowledge in our aspects and historical beginnings also provide essential information shaping our actual self which is very much closer or far from our ideal self. 6. Our can often overwhelm our rational thinking. 7. Our intuitions and habits do not determine the large majority of our lives which we spend on auto pilot mode. 8. If we do not know how our minds work, we can be intentional about influencing our thinking and feeling patterns. 9. You can use the intentional system to change your automatic thinking, feelings and behavioural patterns. In this way, you will become a better agent in terms of taking charge of your life and reaching your goals. 10. Our personal development is only limited to the physical and intellectual aspects. 11. The autopilot system corresponds to our emotions and intuitions. Its cognitive processes take place mainly in the amygdala and other parts of the brain that developed early in our evolution. 12. The more productive and positive the outcome of behaviors are observed, the more the behavior is highly repeated and eventually rewarded. 13 People’s responses do not change as they encounter new situation. There is no interconnection between our “Thoughts, Feelings and Behavior. 15. Our perception to stress, especially brought by the pandemic times, can be directed to productive use only if we make the necessary effort to change.​

Answer:

1.TRUE

2.TRUE

3.FALSE

4.TRUE

5.TRUE

6.TRUE

7.FALSE

8.TRUE

9.TRUE

10.FALSE

11.TRUE

12.TRUE

13.FALSE

15.FALSE

Explanation:

SORRY FOR #14 WLA PONG NAKALAGAY

Answer:

1.true

2.true

3.true

4.true

5.true

6.true

7.true

8.false

9.false

10.true

11.true

12.true

13. True

14.true

PASSAGE: Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi

Ask: PASSAGE: Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).” Teen thinking In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'” Developing sensitivity Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK. Question: What is the dominant feeling of the author in his article? Select one: a. sarcastic b. defiant c. optimistic d. negative

ASAP PLS 30mins nlng po​

Answer:

a.sarcastic

Explanation:

pa brainliest

Answer:

sabog huhuhuhuhuhuhuhuu love you

How could you determine a close ballroom position? A. Partners

Ask: How could you determine a close ballroom position?
A. Partners stand face to face
B. Partners stand face to face, shoulders and hips parallel
C. Partners stand face to face, Boy’s right hand is placed around girl’s waist
D. Partners stand face to face, Girl’s left hand rests lightly against his right shoulders.
Boy’s L hand is raised to the side holding the Girl’s R hand

37. How would you test your learning about Cha cha cha dance?
A. Just visualize the steps in cha cha cha dance.
B. Practice the cha cha cha variations immediately.
C. Keep watching Cha cha cha dance at Youtube
D. Do the basic steps of cha cha dance which you need to master very well
before you can do some variations.

38. What type of drugs abusively used by drug users?
A. Dominant Drugs C. Abused Drugs
B. Drugs of Abuse D. Drugs

39. What do we call the influences which increases the opportunity of using, misusing and abusing drugs?
A. Idolatry C. Myths and Facts
B. Protective Factors D. Risk Factors

40. Which term below shows about influences which reduce the opportunity of using, misusing and abusing drugs?
A. Protective Factors C. Risk Factors
B. Preventive Factors D. Minimalist Factors

41. How would you classify a steps in the decision-making process, if the step includes a process that begins with recognizing a need for change?
A. The step shows – Evaluate the results
B. The step shows – Consider your goals
C. The step shows – Consider the consequences
D. The step shows – Recognizing the problem or opportunity

42. Which one shows a Myth about Drug Abuse?
A. Addiction can happen at any age.
B. Teenagers are young to be addicted.
B. Drugs affect an unborn child as much or more than the mother.
D. Drugs can cause the brain to send the wrong signals to the body.

43. What facts show about Drug Abuse?
A. You can stop using drugs anytime.
B. Teenagers are young to be addicted.
C. Drugs of abuse help in the digestion of food.
D. Drugs can cause the brain to send the wrong signals to the body.

44. What type of drugs known as “painkillers” and administered to patients with mental problems and also given to cancer patients to relieve pain?
A. Depressant drugs C. Narcotics
B. Hallucinogens D. Stimulant drugs

45. Which statement shows the signs and symptoms of drug use?
A. Consulting a psychiatrist C. Loosing concentration
B. Gaining personal properties C. Socializing with friends

Answer:number one po is b

Explanation:

Answer:

D

A

B

C

A

A

C

D

C

A

Explanation:

Sana makatulong

Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi If

Ask: Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).” Teen thinking In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'” Developing sensitivity Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK.

QUESTIONS:
1. What does the author’s use to get her point across?​

Answer:

sana Maka tulong

Explanation:

Sana Maka tulong

Directions: Read the passage and provide an answer to the

Ask: Directions: Read the passage and provide an answer to the question below. PASSAGE: Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).” Teen thinking In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'” Developing sensitivity Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK. Question: Why did the author mention ‘hormonal shift’ in the article? Select one: a. to validate the claim of the research on teens’ behavior in relation to their brain development b. to persuade us to conduct research on teens’ behavior. c. to present the conclusion of the article. d. to make fun of the teenagers

WHAT IS ASKED?

Identify from the given choices the best reason why did the author mention ‘hormonal shift’ in the article.

ANSWER

The best answer from the given choices is Option ATo validate the claim of the research on teens’ behavior in relation to their brain development.

Explanation:

Option A is the best among the choices simply because it points out the truth about the use of the terminology ‘hormonal shifts‘. The passage talked about changes or imbalances faced by teenagers and using the terminology ‘hormonal shift‘ validates those changes or imbalances and also summarizes everything.

Read more here:

Why do teenagers smoke?

https://brainly.ph/question/2681907

Why teenage life is the best?

https://brainly.ph/question/2124943

#LetsStudy

PASSAGE: Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi

Ask: PASSAGE:

Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy

By Sara Goudarzi

If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).”

Teen thinking

In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'”

Developing sensitivity

Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK.

Question:

Why did the author mention about the medial prefrontal cortex?

Select one:
a. to explain the part of the brain responsible for teens’ behavior
b. to encourage us to take care of our brain
c. to reject the research study
d. to compare adult and teen

I think A bc the focus of the study is about the teens and how their behavior is a product of a brain structure

PASSAGE:Study :  Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi  If

Ask: PASSAGE:

Study :  Teenage brain lacks empathy

 By Sara Goudarzi 

 

If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).”

Teen thinking

 In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'”

Developing sensitivity

Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK.      

Question: 

Why did the author mention ‘hormonal shift’ in the article? 

Select one:

a.

to present the conclusion of the article.

b.

to make fun of the teenagers

c.

to persuade us to conduct research on teens’ behavior.

d.

to validate the claim of the research on teens’ behavior in relation to their brain development

Answer:

to present the conclusion of the article

PASSAGE: Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy By Sara Goudarzi

Ask: PASSAGE:

Study : Teenage brain lacks empathy

By Sara Goudarzi

If you ever sense teenagers are not taking your feelings into account, it’s probably because they’re just incapable of doing so. The area of the brain associated with higher-level thinking, empathy, and guilt is underused by teenagers, reports a new study. When considering an action, the teenage medial prefrontal cortex, located in front of the brain, doesn’t get as much action as adults. “Thinking strategies change with age,” said Sarah Jayne Blakemore of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. “As you get older you use more or less the same brain network to make decisions about your actions as you did when you were a teenager, but the crucial difference is that the distribution of that brain activity shifts from the back of the brain (when you are a teenager) to the front (when you are an adult).”

Teen thinking

In the study, teens and adults were asked how they would react to certain situations. As they responded, researchers imaged their brains. Although both adults and teens responded similarly to the questions, their brain activity differed. The medial prefrontal cortex was much more active in the adults than in the teens. However, the teenagers had much more activity in the superior temporal sulcus, the brain area involved in predicting future actions based on previous ones. Adults were also much faster at figuring out how their actions would affect themselves and other people. “We think that a teenager’s judgment of what they would do in a given situation is driven by the simple question: ‘What would I do?'” Blakemore said. “Adults, on the other hand, ask: ‘What would I do, given how I would feel and given how the people around me would feel as a result of my actions?'”

Developing sensitivity

Children start taking into account other people’s feelings around the age of five. But the ability develops well beyond this age, the new research suggests. And while some of this sensitivity could be the result of undeveloped regions in the brain, the experience that adults acquire from social interactions also plays an important role. My purpose in reading this: Reading Strategy I will use: 12 “Whatever the reasons, it is clear that teenagers are dealing with, not only massive hormonal shifts, but also substantial neural changes,” Blakemore said. “These changes do not happen gradually and steadily between the ages of 0–18. They come on in great spurts and puberty is one of the most dramatic developmental stages.” The results of the study were presented today at the BA Festival of Science in the UK.

Question:

Why did the author mention about the medial prefrontal cortex?

Select one:
a. to reject the research study
b. to explain the part of the brain responsible for teens’ behavior
c. to compare adult and teen
d. to encourage us to take care of our brain

ASAP 🙂 TY IN ADVANCE

B. To explain the part of the brain responsible for teens’ behavior.

The study is about teenage lacks empathy. So the the question will be why? Then the author itself answered this by explaining the part of the brain responsible to it.

Not only you can get the answer of how much of the brain do we use, you could also find the answers of TRUE OR FALSE, Directions: Read the, Directions: Read the, How could you, and PASSAGE: Study :.